Rachel, H&P intern, on social media for Tobacco-Free Hawaii

As part of my internship with Hastings & Pleadwell (through the University of Hawaii) I helped with social media training for a longtime client, Coalition for a Tobacco-Free Hawaii’s (CTFH). Today (Thursday, March 31), we are in Hilo, but “live-streaming” the workshop for coalition members and supporters who could not be there in person. (Thanks Melissa, Russ!)

My internship supervisor, Barbra Pleadwell reviews the big picture of social media for non-profit organizations and addresses the often not addressed cyber security issues. Our partners for a number of social media projects are local social media rock stars Russ Sumida and Melissa Chang. They get into the nitty-gritty how-to of social media, especially Facebook and Twitter.

Though I am familiar with the basics covered in the workshop (creating a profile, tagging photos, etc.) I don’t consider myself new media savvy. I have Facebook and Twitter accounts, so I know the interface. But the strategy behind the medium is really interesting. One of the things addressed in the workshop is the fact that social media is evolving and really no one is an expert; everyone is learning.

After some feedback from our first workshop for Tobacco-Free Hawai‘i, I helped prepare a glossary of social media terms (listed below). I hope it helps!

Since the purpose of the workshop is to help shift behavior as it relates to communication, no hardcopy handouts are distributed to participants. This blog provides links to most of the resources mentioned in the training. (See below.)

Social Media Vocabulary

Facebook

Profile: Facebook account that belongs to and is used by an individual.

Pages: Similar to profiles, but are used to represent non-users: organizations, products, etc.

Administrator/Admin: person who controls the content and settings of a page.

Friends: People you have acknowledged knowing by either issuing or accepting a friend request.

News Feed: Aggregation of content from Friends.

Likes (Like button): When clicked, this is how users connect to a page. In essence this is the equivalent of a user becoming your friend.

Wall: Where information is posted by the user/admin and can be used by Fans to comment.


Twitter

Tweet: A 140 character message sent via Twitter.

Follower: Someone who will receive your tweets. Followers can be thought of as your Twitter network.

@: When you place an “@” before the user name of a Twitter user it is a way to direct a tweet to that person/organization. This is often referred to as a mention or reply.

Retweet (RT): A repeated tweet. Used to forward a message on to one’s followers. Also can be used in a reply to show the original Tweet.

RT @username: This is how you would begin a retweet. It tells users that it is a retweet (RT) and who the tweet was posted from (@username). Gives credit to the individual who posted the tweet and allows them to know that you have shared (retweeted) their post (tweet).

#: The “#” is used to indicate a hashtag. A hashtag is used to connect a post with a specific topic. When you use a hashtag, it allows followers and non-followers to find your post on a given topic. For example, the following hashtags have been used to post about the recent natural disasters in Japan:

#japan, #tsunami, #earthquake, #prayforjapan

 

 

Social Media Resource Links:

Social Media Resource Links:

Better Business Bureau Small Business Advice: Five Tips for Ensuring Social Media Success in 2010

Mashable.com (Guide to social media)

Social Media Club Hawaii

Learn to stay safe online – National Cyber Security Alliance homepage

PBS documentary digital world

For some educational, yet funny videos on staying safe online, check out:

Don’t Be a Billy

CyberCriminals

Socialnomics


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Filed under Media Training, New Media, Nonprofit Communication, Online Reputation Management

“Eat Your Spinach, Earn Your Dessert.” Aloha Kauai, Society for Human Resource Management

By Barbra Pleadwell & Kimberly Miyazawa Frank (in collaboration with Saberfort, LLC)

Mahalo SHRM Kaua‘i, for hosting us today and asking us to present “Effective Use of New Media in the Workplace, Avoiding Social Media Fiascos.” When we present on this topic, it forces us to update our knowledge about all things emerging online and how it relates to the workplace. We’ve even updated our presentation title this go-around… our new title is “Eat Your Spinach, Earn Your Dessert.”

Addressing new media in the workplace, especially social media, is a team effort. The HR, Communication (public relations, advertising, marketing), Legal and IT departments should be coordinating messages, training and crisis response. New media holds tremendous opportunity. We call this “dessert.” BUT, we all know that earning our dessert means “eating our spinach.”

SHRM Hawaii Conference 2010: Keynote speaker Eric Winegardner (VP, client adoption, Monster.com, right) joins afternoon presentation on New Media in the Workplace. (S. Edralin, middle; B. Pleadwell, left) Edralin, an expert on compliance and liability issues, delivered the “spinach” of the presentation. Pleadwell, communication strategist, delivered the dessert… opportunities and benefits.

Wise and effective use of the medium should include a review of compliance issues (financial and retail sectors especially) as well as liability risks.

Especially for talks about new media, we try not to use traditional handouts. Rather, we use the online medium to provide a number of resources. Here are the online resources we mentioned in our talk with SHRM Kaua‘i today:

Better Business Bureau Small Business Advice: Five Tips for Ensuring Social Media Success in 2010

Mashable.com (Guide to social media)

Social Media Club Hawaii

Learn to stay safe online – National Cyber Security Alliance homepage

PBS documentary digital world

For some educational, yet funny videos on staying safe online, check out:

Don’t Be a Billy

CyberCriminals

and

Socialnomics

Clip from the South Park FaceBook/SNS episode.

Time Magazine (YouTube’s 50 Best Videos).

CBS News Story: “Copy Machines, a Security Risk?”

Information videos about Facebook’s privacy settings.

Tips and advice for being safe online.

How to report cyber attacks.

–––––

To contact Stella Edralin: info@saberfort.com

To contact Barbra Pleadwell: bap@hastingsandpleadwell.com

Link to H&P’s Facebook Page.

We welcome you to post your own resources on the topic of new media and the workplace.

We credit National Cyber Security Alliance (H&P client) for most of the resources used for our training on cybersecurity. We also acknowledge the Anti-Phishing Working Group for bringing together a convention of online brands known across the nation to launch the campaign: STOP. THINK. CONNECT.

Video clips from SHRM Hawaii presentation:

Stella clip on SNS.

Barbra clip on new media rules of engagement.

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Filed under Corporate Social Responsibility, Crisis Communication, Employee Engagement, New Media, Online Reputation Management, Speaking Engagements

Aloha, Society for Human Resource Management Hawaii: New Media & the Workplace

By Barbra Pleadwell & Stella Edralin (Saberfort)

Mahalo SHRM Hawaii, for hosting us today and asking us to present “Effective Use of New Media in the Workplace, Avoiding Social Media Fiascos.” When we present on this topic, it forces us to update our knowledge about all things emerging online and how it relates to the workplace.

Addressing new media in the workplace, especially social media, is a team effort. The HR, Communication (public relations, advertising, marketing), Legal and IT departments should be coordinating messages, training and crisis response. New media holds tremendous opportunity

SHRM Hawaii Conference 2010: Keynote speaker Eric Winegardner (VP, client adoption, Monster.com, right) joins afternoon presentation on New Media in the Workplace. (S. Edralin, middle; B. Pleadwell, left) Edralin, an expert on compliance and liability issues, delivered the "spinach" of the presentation. Pleadwell, communication strategist, delivered the dessert... opportunities and benefits.

for building brands, engaging constituents, crisis management (natural disasters) and employee communication. Wise and effective use of the medium should include a review of compliance issues (financial and retail sectors especially) as well as liability risks.

Especially for talks about new media, we try not to use traditional handouts. Rather, we use the online medium to provide a number of resources. Here are the online resources we mentioned in our talk with SHRM Hawaii today:

Better Business Bureau Small Business Advice: Five Tips for Ensuring Social Media Success in 2010

Mashable.com (Guide to social media)

Social Media Club Hawaii

Learn to stay safe online – National Cyber Security Alliance homepage

PBS documentary digital world

For some educational, yet funny videos on staying safe online, check out:

Don’t Be a Billy

CyberCriminals

and

Socialnomics

Clip from the South Park FaceBook/SNS episode.

Time Magazine (YouTube’s 50 Best Videos).

CBS News Story: “Copy Machines, a Security Risk?”

Information videos about Facebook’s privacy settings.

Tips and advice for being safe online.

How to report cyber attacks.

–––––

To contact Stella Edralin: info@saberfort.com

To contact Barbra Pleadwell: bap@hastingsandpleadwell.com

Link to H&P’s Facebook Page.

We welcome you to post your own resources on the topic of new media and the workplace.

We credit National Cyber Security Alliance (H&P client) for most of the resources used for our training on cybersecurity. We also acknowledge the Anti-Phishing Working Group for bringing together a convention of online brands known across the nation to launch the campaign: STOP. THINK. CONNECT.

Video clips from SHRM Hawaii presentation:

Stella clip on SNS.

Barbra clip on new media rules of engagement.

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Filed under Corporate Social Responsibility, Crisis Communication, Employee Engagement, Human Resources, Internal messaging, New Media, Online Reputation Management, Speaking Engagements, Uncategorized

Hawaii Firms Helped Craft “Stop. Think. Connect.” Cyber Security Message

By Barbra Pleadwell

Earlier this year, Hastings & Pleadwell joined forces with Heart + Mind Strategies, a market research firm in Washington, D.C. to help craft the safety message for online brands across the nation. Today (Monday, Oct. 4, 2010), the results were launched in a national campaign starting with the White House. In addition to Hastings & Pleadwell, Hawaii-based firms Humanhand and Wagnervision were subcontractors helping to shape the message.

Press Contacts:

Aimee Larsen-Kirkpatrick

National Cyber Security Alliance

(202) 570-7431

aimee@staysafeonline.org

STOP.THINK.CONNECT.: Broad Government, Industry and Non-Profit Coalition Unveils First-Ever Coordinated Online Safety Message

Unified Message Part of a Global Public Awareness Campaign Launched During October’s National Cyber Security Awareness Month

October 4, 2010, Seattle, Wash. – An unprecedented coalition of government, industry and non-profit organizations today unveiled the first-ever unified public awareness message to help all digital citizens stay safer and more secure online. The message – Stop. Think. Connect.– was revealed at the kickoff of National Cyber Security Awareness Month, held every October, and will appear throughout the world.  Starting today, the new message will reach millions across the globe through a variety of online and offline marketing, advertising and editorial campaigns.

The goal is to help all digital citizens employ universal behaviors to protect themselves, no matter what they are doing online or how they are connecting to the Internet.  Hopefully this will lead to a culture of cyber awareness in which online safety steps become second nature in our daily lives.

“’Stop. Think. Connect.’ is a simple, actionable message that applies to everyone as we connect to the Internet from an array of devices, including laptops, personal computers, smart phones and gaming consoles,” said NCSA Executive Director Michael Kaiser. “Taking a quick moment to evaluate that we are prepared to access the Internet, provide information or engage in the larger community online can increase our sense of personal security, confidence, and peace of mind.”

The creation of the unified message was the result of an intensive collaborative effort over the past year from the Online Consumer Security and Safety Messaging Convention, an effort organized by the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), the Anti-Phishing Working Group (APWG), key industry leaders, government agencies, and nonprofits.

“Our research bears out that consumers are anxious to take personal control for their online actions and eager to learn more about keeping safe online not just for themselves and their family members but also for the greater online community,” said APWG Secretary General Peter Cassidy, principal author of the project plan for the Messaging Convention. “The ‘Stop. Think. Connect.’ awareness slogan grew out of our in-depth study of online safety, attitudes and behaviors and we are honored and delighted to see this essential awareness message being put to action in October for National Cyber Security Awareness Month.”

The message is designed to be a simple, yet effective awareness tool that can be easily understood and implemented by everyone, much like other public safety campaigns such as “Look Both Ways Before Crossing the Street” and “Stop, Look and Listen.”

Stop. Think. Connect. in Motion

Members of the coalition are enthusiastically promoting the national awareness campaign messages to broad audiences in the United States and abroad at public events, through print, broadcast and online social media and advertising campaigns. Examples include:

AT&T continues to lead the industry with its “in the cloud” approach to cybersecurity. The company is reaffirming its commitment to cybersecurity education with multiple initiatives designed to communicate the campaign message of “Stop. Think. Connect.” among customers, employees and key stakeholders.  During the month of October, AT&T’s consumer bill page and att.net homepage will reference the “Stop. Think. Connect.” campaign as well as direct subscribers to AT&T’s online safety website for more information and tools, such as anti-virus software, on how to stay safe online. AT&T is also planning several activities to incorporate the campaign’s message into internal communications regarding National Cyber Security Awareness Month in October to help educate employees on the importance of cybersecurity and provide them with resources to improve their personal online security, protect their families and friends, and discuss cybersecurity in their local communities.

Hundreds of employee volunteers from Massachusetts-based EMC and its RSA Security Division are dedicating an entire month of service in classrooms and youth groups by teaching school-age children in 22 states and 6 countries about safe and responsible online behavior using the NCSA’s Cyber Security Awareness Volunteer Education (C-SAVE) curriculum. In addition to a month-long advertising and publicity campaign, the company is also releasing a fun and educational “Stop. Think. Connect.” song and music video as part of its National Cyber Security Awareness Month activities.

ESET will incorporate the message of “Stop. Think. Connect.” into the existing cybersecurity awareness activities of its “Securing Our eCity” initiative. Securing Our eCity (SOeC), a public-private partnership between local businesses, government and law enforcement has grown to include both national and international stakeholders. To further the work of the “Stop. Think. Connect.” campaign, SOeC is building upon the proactive stance that the city of San Diego has toward cyber awareness, education and preparation, through a series of billboards and PSAs highlighting the “Stop. Think. Connect.” message. It has also taken the message online, with cyberbullying awareness videos and other educational collateral both on the SOeC website, retail partners and various social media channels. Additionally, SOeC will hold its “Cybersecurity Symposium II and 1st Annual Cybersecurity Awards” on October 7.

Facebook worked with NCSA, APWG, and Involver to develop a “Stop. Think. Connect.” security quiz hosted on the Facebook Security Page.  People who take the quiz will be able to test their knowledge and learn best practices for staying safe and secure online.  After completing the quiz, they’ll be able to post a badge to their Facebook Wall and share tips with their friends.  Facebook will be promoting the quiz through updates to the News Feeds of the over 2.6 million people who have liked the Facebook Security Page, as well as the over 20 million people who have liked the Facebook Page.  Facebook has also donated 35 million ad impressions globally over the month of October to promote both the quiz and message.

Microsoft’s Online Safety and Privacy Education page will feature the “Stop. Think. Connect.” messaging as well as a host of other tips, advice and guidance.

Verizon is one participating company that plans to use the campaign as a cornerstone of a yearlong global focus on the importance of cybersecurity. Verizon’s multi-pronged campaign will be directed at consumer and business clients, employees and associates as well as other key stakeholders such as shareholders and government partners. The company continues to place a heavy emphasis on “baked-in” security, meaning products and services have a layer of security already included.  Additionally, Verizon plans to host educational security sessions for employees, consumers and business clients while sharing ongoing security tips through a variety of online channels including Facebook and Twitter. Verizon also continues to develop new products and services that safeguard customers online.

Visa Inc. is promoting “Stop. Think. Connect.” and providing additional education for payment cardholders to stay safe while transacting online. A new Web resource at www.visa.securitysense.com supports the NCSA’s campaign with practical know-how for protecting account information online, avoiding payment card scams and resolving unauthorized card use.

The Process for Developing a Unified National Online Safety Message

In May 2009, President Obama’s Cyberspace Policy Review called for the creation of a national public awareness campaign focused on cybersecurity. The White House pointed out the need for a campaign that would achieve for online safety what the “Smokey Bear” campaign did for forest fire prevention and the “Click It or Ticket” campaign did for seatbelt safety.

In the spirit of those programs, the Online Consumer Security and Safety Messaging Convention was organized by APWG and the NCSA.  In fact, APWG was already working on the development of the Messaging Convention organizing committee in March and April of 2009, recruiting members of the initial Messaging Convention organizing committee and charting the project’s course.

The Convention currently includes a diverse membership of commercial enterprises and public agencies, including: ADP; AT&T; AVG; Costco; ESET; Facebook; Good Research; Google; Intel; Intuit; Microsoft; PayPal; RSA, The Security Division of EMC; Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC); Symantec; Trend Micro; Verizon; VeriSign; Visa; Walmart; Yahoo!; the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE); the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS); U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs; the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS); and the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA).

The convention selected the “Stop. Think. Connect.” message after a yearlong process of member meetings, research, focus groups, opinion polling and industry and government collaboration. The consumer research, conducted by Heart + Mind Strategies, revealed that 96 percent of Americans feel a personal responsibility to be safer and more secure online, while 93 percent said that their online actions can protect not only friends and family, but also help to make the Web safer for everyone around the world.

The study also revealed the need for simple, easy-to-understand, actionable resources and tips to help ensure their safety and security online. Access to this type of information equips and empowers users to make more-informed decisions – even before they go online, the poll revealed.

Overall, the study revealed that Americans feel safest online when they are taking personal action for their own Internet security.  Sixty-one percent believe that much of online safety and security falls under their personal control, and consistent with those feelings, 90 percent said they want to learn more about keeping safer on the Internet.

About the National Survey

Heart + Mind Strategies conducted the national survey online with 1,007 U.S. adults ages 18 and up between May 21-25, 2010. The poll was part of an extensive analysis on online behaviors and attitudes for NCSA and APWG.

About The National Cyber Security Alliance

The National Cyber Security Alliance is a nonprofit organization. Through collaboration with the government, corporate, non-profit and academic sectors, the mission of the NCSA is to empower a digital citizenry to use the Internet securely and safely protecting themselves and the technology they use and the digital assets we all share. NCSA works to create a culture of cyber security and safety through education and awareness activities.   Visit http://www.staysafeonline.org for more information.

About the APWG

The APWG, founded in 2003 as the Anti-Phishing Working Group, is a global industry, law enforcement, and government coalition focused on eliminating the identity theft and fraud that result from the growing problem of phishing, email spoofing, and crimeware. Membership is open to qualified financial institutions, online retailers, ISPs, the law enforcement community and solutions providers. There are more than 1,800 companies, government agencies and NGOs participating in the APWG and more than 3,600 members. The APWG’s Web site offers the public and industry information about phishing and email fraud, including identification and promotion of pragmatic technical solutions that provide immediate protection.

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Eat Local Challenge: Kids Learn from Kid-Chef Duke Kenney at Waialae Charter School

By Barbra Pleadwell

My kid is a first grader at Waialae Charter School. It was our pleasure to mix work with school involvement tonight. Most photos featured in this blog post were taken by my daughter, Bella Grace Harper. Weʻll get her video up on You Tube shortly.

One of Kanu Hawaiiʻs newest members

Kokua Hawaii Foundation’s Actively Integrating Nutrition & Agriculture (‘AINA) in Schools program held a cooking demonstration by nine-year-old Chef Duke Kenney, along with his father, Chef Ed Kenney, at Waialae Charter School to kickoff Kanu Hawaiiʻs Eat Local Challenge.

Kenney prepared a delicious, nearly completely locally sourced meal the whole family can make at home. Steaks from Maui Cattle Co., pa‘i‘ai from “uncle Dan,” cherry/grape tomatoes from Hoʻs Farm, Maui onion, green onions, Hawaiian sea salt, Frankieʻs Waimanalo Peppercorn, Naked Cow Dairy Butter and Mac Nut oil were used. The fresh ingredients were provided by Whole Foods Market Kahala.

Kids attending the event swarmed the kid chef’s creation when samples were passed out.

Kanu Hawaii’s “Eat Local Challenge” — a week-long campaign featuring locally grown and raised ingredients in markets, farms, stores and restaurants across the state—begins Sunday, Sept. 26. Now in its second year, the 2010 Eat Local Challenge theme is “Harvest to Table.”

If you are interested in making a commitment to Eat Local this week, consider making that commitment on Kanuʻs website: www.kanuhawaii.org

Kanu Hawaii is a tax-exempt, nonprofit corporation overseen by a volunteer board and administered by a small staff. The mission is to protect and promote island living through a connection to the aina, a culture of aloha, and local economic self-reliance. There are more than 12,000 members registered with Kanu Hawaii.

Chef Duke Kenney gets a rise from the crowd while Waialae Charter School CEO Wendy Lagareta opens the presentation.

Father and son chef duo have fun demonstrating local cooking.

Samples of local eats go quickly.

Live stream of Duke Kenney, kid chef, presenting on his locally produced food recipe.

http://www.hawaiiirl.com/blog/2010/09/21/live-video-“exec-kid-chef”-duke-kenney-cooking-local-demo-600pm-tomorrow-wfmkahala-kokua/

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Filed under Corporate Social Responsibility, Events, General Public Relations, Green Communication, Nonprofit Communication, Speaking Engagements

Navigating New Media: Blogs, YouTube, SNS and Cyber Security with Windward O‘ahu Rotary

By Barbra Pleadwell

Thank you Windward O‘ahu Rotary Club, for hosting me today. Each time we present on this topic, it forces us to update our knowledge about all things emerging online.

For talks about new media, our firm tries not to use traditional handouts. Rather, we use the medium to provide a number of resources. Here are some of our favorites:

(Scroll past the videos and links for cybersecurity tips we helped create for the National Cyber Security Alliance.)

Better Business Bureau Small Business Advice: Five Tips for Ensuring Social Media Success in 2010

Mashable.com (Guide to social media)

Social Media Club Hawaii

Learn to stay safe online – National Cyber Security Alliance homepage

PBS documentary digital world

For some educational, yet funny videos on staying safe online, check out:

Don’t Be a Billy

CyberCriminals

and

Socialnomics

Clip from the South Park FaceBook/SNS episode.

Just for fun, here’s my Granny’s quilt on YouTube:

Time Magazine (YouTube’s 50 Best Videos).

CBS News Story: “Copy Machines, a Security Risk?”

In Hawaii, online news:

Hawaii’s Peer News’ Civil Beat: Be you. Be cool. Be civil.

Information about being safe online:

Stop. Think. Connect.

Safer for me. More secure for all.

Internet safety requires a small, regular commitment to common sense and awareness.

Protecting yourself (and the rest of us) isn’t difficult. Simple actions and thoughtful behavior will make us good online citizens, and help us avoid becoming victims of cybercrime.

Online security habits should be second nature. Just like buckling our seatbelts, washing our hands, looking both ways and not forgetting to floss, our safe online existence depends on our commitment to STOP and THINK before we CONNECT online.

The Internet is a global, shared community where we work, learn, explore, transact, and connect with family, friends and the world. Adopting safer online habits will make the Internet more secure for all, and bring confidence and peace of mind to life online.

1. Keep a Clean Machine, Newer is Better

Up-to-date software is your best defense. Developers regularly upgrade their software to deliver the best protection against the latest threats—worms, viruses and other malware. Take the time to install the newest versions of all your security software—anti-spam, anti-virus, anti-spyware software, firewall, operating system and web browsers.

Update automatically. Many software programs update or prompt you to update. Make sure these upgrades are happening. (Check the version of the application on your computer or mobile device against the company’s current information.)

Know what’s running on your machine—especially on shared equipment. (Check your applications folder, and review all folders for unfamiliar programs. Get professional help if you see something out of the ordinary.)

Mobile devices such as smartphones, touchpads and other wireless technologies are exploding. Mobile computing security programs and services are emerging as well. Check your digital device’s company information for the latest security options such as encryption and decryption, online backup, and safety ratings for download files.

Keeping current helps safeguard the Internet for all of us.

2. Connect with Care

Protect your passwords.

  • Make them complex by using a combination of letters, numbers and symbols. Change them often. Use different passwords for all your accounts. Keep them in a hard-to-find location.
  • Use new tools. Proving who you are online (password and authentication technology) is evolving quickly. There are inexpensive programs that generate highly complex passwords and store them for you, encrypted. Ask your bank and others about the new tools they offer.
  • Be vigilant. Check regularly and activate security settings for your social networking, banking and online shopping accounts. If your tools are outdated or your settings incorrect, you could expose yourself and the people you connect with to prying eyes.

Customize your privacy settings. Social networking sites are simplifying their privacy controls—and providing more options. Visit the privacy settings page for the social networks you use. Learn how to limit what the world can see about you. Evaluate the risk to you and others anytime you share personal information online.

Conduct financial transactions only on secure sites. Look for the “s.” Website addresses that start with http:// are not secure. Any site asking you to provide payment information should be https:// or shttp:// meaning the site is encrypted. Make certain that “s” is there.

Know how you got there.  When navigating online, we often arrive at new sites through links provided by others. Consider how you got there before you interact or make a transaction.

Know why personal information is being requested and how it will be used. Be wary of requests for information that seem out of the ordinary for conducting business. For example, a request from a bank or ecommerce site to log onto your account directly via an email link is likely bogus.

Know phishing. Spam (junk email) accounts for the majority of email. Some try to sell you products, others are designed to lure you into sharing information that will put your identity and/or money at risk, jeopardize friends and colleagues in your network, or reveal confidential business information (client lists, banking credentials, intellectual property).

  • Confirm the source of any suspect email or attachment. If an email arrives from a friend or colleague saying “check this out!”, STOP and THINK. If it’s enticing, THINK TWICE about opening it. When in doubt, pick up the phone and verify its integrity.
  • It’s OK not to act on emails that implore you to act immediately, provide extensive personal or password information. Often these emails appear to come from your bank or a site you visit regularly. They may look familiar, but THINK about what they are asking you to do.

Safeguarding your personal information protects others. A cautious mindset and few simple actions will put you in control.

3. Be Web Wise.

Learn more about the threats (malware, phishing, email scams, spam, identity theft). Understand what these words mean, so you’ll know a threat when you see it.

Going wireless can be risky. Public networks (WiFi hotspots in public places) are not the place to conduct private business such as banking or share personal information.

When you protect yourself, you’re protecting others. A security breach of any kind could mean the loss of confidential business documents, intellectual property, personal files, or your own hard work.

4.  Be a Good Online Citizen

Personal responsibility is the place to begin. Most online security lapses happen because someone wasn’t careful. Responsible online habits and a few good tools can help make sure that someone is never you.

Set a good example. Make a small, regular commitment to responsible actions and behaviors at home, work and school.

Help others. Do the same for any young or elderly people in your life who may need help navigating security systems and procedures.

Report crime. Report stolen business or personal identities and other malicious intrusions to www.ic3.gov (Internet Crime Complaint Center), the Federal Trade Commission (if it’s fraud), and to your local authority.

Regularly visit credible government and industry sites for the latest information:

Regularly visit your vendor sites for security program information and news.

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Gubernatorial Debate Set for East Hawaii

By Amanda Taniguchi

On Tuesday, August 31, two Democratic gubernatorial hopefuls will meet at the University of Hawaii-Hilo Performing Arts Center to debate.  Former U.S. Congressman Neil Abercrombie and former Honolulu Mayor Mufi Hannemann, Democrats, are pitted against each other in the primary.

A coalition of business-interest groups are sponsoring—Hawaii Island Chamber of Commerce, Japanese Chamber of Commerce & Industry of Hawaii, the Kanoelehua Area Industrial Association (KIAA), the Hawaii Island Board of Realtors, the Hawaii Island Contractors’ Association and the Hawaii Tribune Herald.

The event may be the only chance for East Hawaii residents to meet and hear from the candidates.  The debate aims to answer the questions and concerns principally of the business community, and  in a respectful manner.

Ten lieutenant governor candidates indicated they will also participate in  a “Meet ‘n Greet” session beginning at 5:30 p.m.  The debate starts at 6:25 p.m.  Brief remarks by the lieutenant governor candidates will be given prior to the debate.

Linda Coble, TV and radio veteran, will moderate  the debate with Todd Belt, Ph.D., a political scientist and Wayne Yoshioka, Haswaii Public Radio politics reporter, as panelists. Jerry Burris, dean of Hawaii political reporting, has also been invited to participate.

Reserved seats will be held for members of sponsoring organizations. Open seating is  limited for the general public and will be available on a first come, first serve basis.

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